The Warwhoop

Grandma That Keeps Going

Caitlyn Dickey

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Sue Meyers knows just about everyone and just about everyone knows her. She was born June 29, 1948, and has lived in Wayne City most of her life. She has had many jobs doing all the dirty work that most guys do. What made her decide what she does today was from driving a truck moving an MRI unit around to different places. She did this for seven years on a five-year contract.

After she finished her job there, a friend told her to be a minority contractor, which is a female-owned business, and she would get to do jobs a whole lot more than what she did now. By doing this she could keep her old job and do the minority which involves state work but makes $50,000 a year. She seeded the right of ways of the roadways, landscaped, hauled asphalt, and coal mine reclamation. Sue started, SAM Inc., her own business in 1991. She wanted to do it because most of the work was outside. Not a lot of people want to do this job,because it is hard work and people get dirty. Sue told a story about one day on a job. “We were down on the job and we were all so tired and dirty. It was a Saturday, and we always stopped and ate after we got done. I asked what they wanted to eat and nobody really told me, so I called into the steakhouse and order some steaks. We were still all dirty but when we got there, they had a table reserved for us with steaks, potatoes, and salads all on the table. She said the employees still remember that day.”

The downfall to this is you have to have the equipment to do this job. She had to buy tractors, straw blowers, and trucks to be able to do it. It is hard to get this equipment when you are just starting and do not have a ton of money to buy it. She told another story about a different job that she was doing. She said, “Everybody went home, but we still had work to do. One of my employees, Jim, was blowing straw, I was packing straw, and one was running the crimper. It got dark and we kept on going and going. We finished the job at 3:00 in the morning finally.” Sue said it is good to have a family business because now that she has gotten older, Lisa Dickey, her daughter, has taken over the business. She is still very active and still doing what she loves. Just the other day she was driving a big truck again, and she’s probably never going to slow down until she can’t get in the truck anymore.

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Grandma That Keeps Going